The Band Will Invest This Money In Two REDD+ Projects In South America:

Conservation International’s Alto Mayo Project in Peru +

Carbonfund.org Foundation’s Valparaiso Amazon Rainforest Project in Brazil

Pearl Jam will perform before nearly half-a-million fans on its tour of Latin America, which kicks off on November 4, 2015 in Santiago, Chile and wraps up on November 28 in Mexico City.A complete list of tour dates are listed here: www.pearljam.com/tour 

As they’ve done for over a decade, the band will offset carbon dioxide emissions resulting from their 2015 live performances through strategic investments in carbon mitigation projects. Their two newest investments are both certified REDD+ (Reducing Emissions from Deforestation and Degradation ‘plus’) projects in South America: Conservation International’s Alto Mayo Project in Peru and Carbonfund.org Foundation’s Valparaiso Amazon Rainforest Project in Brazil.

 “I think it’s good to acknowledge the negative impacts our business has on the planet, right alongside the positive ones. We tour. Our tours emit carbon dioxide. We are constantly looking at ways to reduce and mitigate that. Our strategy has been to essentially ‘tax’ ourselves for our CO2-equivalent emissions, and invest that money into carbon mitigation projects. Hopefully this will serve as inspiration for other businesses and governments exploring ways to offset their carbon footprints,” says Pearl Jam’s Stone Gossard.

Pearl Jam have been tracking their tour-related carbon emissions since 2003, and to-date have made mitigation investments totaling over $500,000 USD. The band’s full carbon mitigation history is here: http://www.pearljam.com/activism/carbon-mitigation 

ASSETs for Life scientist Michael Totten helps the band identify its biggest carbon dioxide culprits on tour. For Pearl Jam, this includes: band and crew air travel, hotels, truck and freight travel, power at venues, and fan transportation to and from the shows. 

The Conservation International and Carbonfund.org Foundation projects that Pearl Jam is investing in this year are certified at the highest levels, and structured to help fight the negative impacts of climate change while providing real benefits to the local communities. 

Carbonfund.org’s Valparaiso Amazon Rainforest Project in Brazil also is a certified REDD+ project and achieved Gold Level Distinction to the Climate, Community and Biodiversity Standard (CCBS) due to the Project’s exceptional community benefits. The Project undertook a forest carbon inventory, modeled regional deforestation and land-use patterns, and is mitigating deforestation pressures by utilizing payments for the Project’s ecosystem services, along with ongoing monitoring of the climate, community and biodiversity impacts of the Project. More information on the Project can be found here: http://www.climate-standards.org/2013/07/18/the-valparaiso-project/ 

“We’re thrilled to partner with Pearl Jam in this important environmental initiative to neutralize the impact of the band’s Brazil tour dates this November,” says Eric Carlson, President of Carbonfund.org.  “Their ongoing leadership and commitment to ‘walking the walk’ should inspire their fans and other performers to follow Pearl Jam’s lead.  Our forest preservation and biodiversity conservation projects in Brazil are so critical to protecting the Amazon Rainforest and helping to fight the negative impacts of climate change.”  

 

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The Envira Amazonia Project involves numerous local and international partners that will collectively protect nearly 500,000 acres in the Amazon Rainforest – the world’s largest rainforest - from conversion to large-scale cattle ranches and prevent millions of tonnes of greenhouse gas emissions. 

Avoided deforestation projects are critical because about 15 percent of global warming is attributed to deforestation, which reduces the Earth's capacity to absorb carbon dioxide. Moreover, fallen trees decompose and release methane, a heat-trapping gas about 23 times more potent than CO2

The Envira Amazonia Project is now being reviewed for verification to the Verified Carbon Standard (VCS) and the Climate, Community and Biodiversity Standard (CCBS) with Gold Distinction for exceptional biodiversity and community benefits, along with Gold Distinction for climate change adaptation measures.

Envira Classroom

 

To review the complete Project Documents and submit comments for the Envira Amazonia Project, please visit the following link during the official Public Comment Period of October 7, 2015 to November 6, 2015: http://www.climate-standards.org/2014/10/21/envira-amazonia-project/ 

The Envira Amazonia Project is a Reducing Emissions from Deforestation and Degradation (REDD+) project that shall mitigate deforestation, preserve extraordinary biodiversity, and provide alternative economic opportunities to local communities.  

 

Social projects and activities to mitigate deforestation pressures and benefit the local communities include, but are not limited to: agricultural extension training courses; boat patrols of potential deforestation sites; improving local schools and health clinics; and developing local infrastructure to collect, transport and sell locally-sourced açaí, medicinal plants and rubber. 

The Envira Amazonia Project is also providing a variety of essential ecosystem services such as: erosion and flood control; water cycling, filtration and storage; oxygen production and nutrient recycling; and habitat for thousands of native Amazonian plant and animal species including several vulnerable tree species and numerous endemic bird species. 

   

Envira School

  Thank you for your ongoing support!

 

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In the world's largest rainforest, the Purus Project involves numerous local and international partners that will protect nearly 90,000 acres from slash-and-burn forest clearing and prevent a million tonnes of greenhouse gas emissions. 

Avoided deforestation projects are critical because about 20 percent of global warming is attributed to deforestation, which reduces the Earth's capacity to absorb carbon dioxide. Moreover, fallen trees decompose and release methane, a heat-trapping gas about 23 times more potent than CO2. 

The Purus Project was successfully validated to the Verified Carbon Standard (VCS) and to the Climate, Community and Biodiversity Standard (CCBS) with Gold Distinction in January 2013.  The Project was then successfully verified to the VCS and CCBS in December 2013 and October 2014.  The Project is now being reviewed for its third verification to assess the Project’s performance from January 1st, 2014 to December 31st, 2014. 

To review the complete Project Documents and to submit comments between Tuesday, July 14th and Thursday, August 13th, please visit: http://www.climate-standards.org/2012/10/20/the-purus-project-a-tropical-forest-conservation-project-in-acre-brazil/

The Purus Project is a Reducing Emissions from Deforestation and forest Degradation (REDD+) project that will preserve the area's rich biodiversity, including scarlet macaws, Amazon River dolphins and squirrel monkeys.  There are also a variety of social projects and activities to mitigate deforestation pressures and benefit the local communities.  In addition, the Purus Project will provide essential ecosystem services such as erosion control and water filtration. 

Climate, community and biodiversity benefits between January 1st, 2014 and December 31st, 2014 included, but were not limited to: a reduction in the Project Area’s deforestation; preservation of biologically diverse habitats; completion of a biodiversity study using motion-sensitive wildlife camera traps; installation of a permanent phone at the Project headquarters; medical assistance provided to approximately 180 local community members; and initiation of granting official land title to several local communities. 

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The Purus, Russas and Valparaiso Projects involve numerous local and international partners that will collectively protect nearly 250,000 acres in the Amazon Rainforest – the world’s largest rainforest - from slash-and-burn forest clearing and prevent millions of tonnes of greenhouse gas emissions. 

Avoided deforestation projects are critical because about 20 percent of global warming is attributed to deforestation, which reduces the Earth's capacity to absorb carbon dioxide. Moreover, fallen trees decompose and release methane, a heat-trapping gas about 23 times more potent than CO2. 

The Purus Project was successfully validated to the Verified Carbon Standard (VCS) and to the Climate, Community and Biodiversity Standard (CCBS) with Gold Distinction in January 2013.  The Purus Project is now being reviewed for verification to the VCS and CCBS to assess the Project’s past performance.

To review the complete Project Documents and submit comments, please visit: http://www.climate-standards.org/2012/10/20/the-purus-project-a-tropical-forest-conservation-project-in-acre-brazil/ 

The Russas and Valparaiso Projects are both currently being reviewed for validation to the VCS and CCBS.  

To review their complete Project Documents and submit comments, please visit: http://www.climate-standards.org/2013/07/18/the-valparaiso-project/ and http://www.climate-standards.org/2013/07/18/the-russas-project/

 The Purus, Russas and Valparaiso Projects are Reducing Emissions from Deforestation and Degradation (REDD+) projects that will mitigate deforestation, preserve extraordinary biodiversity, and provide alternative economic opportunities to local communities.  Social projects and activities to mitigate deforestation pressures and benefit the local communities include, but are not limited to: agricultural extension training, forest patrols of potential deforestation sites, improving local schools and health clinics, and eventually building better houses and installing solar photovoltaic panels for the local communities to improve their livelihoods. 

The Purus, Russas and Valparaiso Projects will also provide a variety of essential ecosystem services such as: erosion and flood control; water cycling, filtration and storage; oxygen production and nutrient recycling; genetic repository for medicinal plants; and habitat for thousands of native Amazonian animal (including scarlet macaws and Amazon River dolphins) and plant species.

Published in carbonfree blog