Wednesday, 29 July 2009 16:05

Carbon Offset Purchasing Guide Released

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rpnlogoThe Responsible Purchasing Network (RPN) - a project of the Center for a New American Dream - has released its purchasing guide for carbon offsets. RPN had contacted Carbonfund.org as a nonprofit provider who has worked with over 1,200 businesses & organizations. The guide is a comprehensive source of information that is particularly useful for businesses and institutions that are looking into offsetting their carbon footprint. The guide empowers readers by outlining the framework for what makes a quality carbon offset, the standards, third-party verification and auditing. Carbon offset standards like the Voluntary Carbon Standard, the Climate Acton Reserve, the Gold Standard and the Climate, Community and Biodiversity Standards ensure that projects meet the most stringent additionality and permanence requirements - thus making the projects real and reliable. Unlike other offset guides out there today this guide makes no attempt to rank providers. Many carbon offset provider rankings are based on subjective and/or arbitrary criteria that may or may not have anything to do with whether an offset is real or of high quality. Click here to view the guide.
Thursday, 24 September 2009 15:39

The Carbon Offset Survey Says...

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EcoSecurities is about to launch the second iteration of their Carbon Management and Offsetting Trends Survey Results new and improved for 2009. The survey participants included 280 companies and 31 carbon offset organizations from all over the world to gain insights into green purchasing patterns and important decision making factors. Carbonfund.org participated in the survey that is slated for public download on September 29th. Carbonfund.org is honored to be a top recognized carbon offset provider in the survey.Carbonfund.org top carbon offset provider Some key insights from the study is that interest in green issues is still high despite the recession, with 76% of companies surveyed having implemented or are developing a carbon plan and 60% of companies have measured their carbon footprint. But North American companies are lagging behind, with only 54% of companies surveyed having completed a carbon footprint assessment. Other highlights from the survey include:
  • Over three quarters of companies have implemented or have started developing a carbon management strategy
  • Two thirds of respondents have already offset their carbon emissions or will consider offsetting in the future
  • Environmental benefits (91%) were highlighted as one of the main motivations for interest in carbon offsets, closely followed by carbon neutrality and marketing (89%)
  • 72% of participants nominated the US as the most desirable geographic region for purchasing offsets; this may reflect the desire for domestic projects as 56% of the respondents came from North America. Africa and South America were also rated as highly desirable locations for emission reduction projects
  • Respondents prefer renewable energy projects above any other project type with solar scoring 92% and wind 86%
By and large, the majority of respondents have a favorable view of carbon offsets and choose to support offsets for positive reasons.  But even with so many companies offsetting and the maturity of the market, many companies are still unclear on the carbon standards out there (though there is a strong preference for projects that meet third party standards). Please This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it. with any questions about carbon offsets. Learn how to measure, reduce and offset your carbon footprint with the highest quality third-party validated carbon offsets. Curious about your carbon footprint? Check out our carbon calculators.
CF Certified ProductTwo free webinars will enable you to learn about two exciting programs we offer- product certification, featuring the first carbon neutral product label in the US-- CarbonFree® Certified, and our CarbonFree® Business program. You can sign up for them now: the product certification webinar on Nov. 12, and the business program webinar on Nov. 17. The CarbonFree® Certified Label has already been used by leading brands, and provides a meaningful, transparent way for you to provide carbon neutral products to your customers. This webinar will provide a helpful overview of the process involved in obtaining our label and making your product carbon neutral. Thursday, November 12th, 2pm ET Speakers: · Caterina Conti - Executive Vice President, Chief Administrative Officer and General Counsel of Anvil Knitwear, Inc., which certified & launched its AnvilRecycled™ apparel CarbonFree® · Christopher Kral - Senior consultant with WSP Environment & Energy on determining a product's carbon footprint · Emily Pugliese - Senior Climate Change Specialist, CarbonFree® Product Certification Program of Carbonfund.org on the certification process Join leading companies such as Motorola, Florida Crystals, and Anvil Knitwear which have certified and successfully launched products CarbonFree®, using the label to impart their environmental commitment, differentiate their brands and help increase sales and customer satisfaction. CF PartnerOur CarbonFree® Business Program lets your business take charge of its carbon footprint and benefit from Carbonfund.org’s services for CarbonFree® Partners. The program is an innovative and flexible way to help your business reduce and offset its carbon footprint. Tuesday, November 17th, 2 pm ET Speakers: Karen Kiley - Vice President, Building Operations, Discovery Communications, parent of Discovery Channel, TLC, TreeHugger and other media brands Eric Carlson - President, Carbonfund.org From Fortune 500 companies to small & start-up businesses, the program comprises many of the most innovative, environmentally responsible companies. Remember to sign up for your free product certification and/or business program webinar today.
GreenHawks Mascot Dunkin and Jason FitzgeraldYesterday I had the privilege of attending the first press conference of the Maryland GreenHawks, a professional basketball team that is about "more than basketball," said Tom Doyle, the CEO and President of the Premier Basketball League.  New Head Coach Rob Spon is hungry for a championship after coaching the PBL team Manchester Millrats last year to a 16-4 record.  Highlighting key players such as Byron Mouton, Scooter Sherrill, and Daniel Artest, the Maryland GreenHawks are sporting serious talent this season.  Above is a picture of me with their mascot Dunkin! So what makes the GreenHawks so green?  Well, the team will be delivering messages of environmental responsibility to fans and the youth they volunteer with, in addition to playing in recycled uniforms.  They even took a big step and offset with Carbonfund.org the team's travel to away games, its ten home games, and its corporate facility. Let's put that into tangible terms: the Maryland GreenHawks are offsetting the carbon dioxide emissions of over 20,000 gallons of gasoline or those avoided by recycling over 62 tons of waste instead of sending it to a landfill.  Their donation is supporting carbon reduction projects that result in the equivalent amount of carbon sequestered annually by over 40 acres of pine forest. Their first home game is January 16, 2010 at the Thomas S. Wootton Athletic Center at Wootton High School in Rockville, Maryland.  Their full schedule is here!  Email This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it. for more information.
CFDIn the DC metro area, it's Car Free Day, encouraging commuters to consider alternatives to driving. If more people biked, took transit or walked, not only would it free up some room on the highways and roads, it would reduce air pollution and encourage exercise. In fact, the DC metro area has some of the lowest air quality in the country. Although as a region DC has some avid runners and great trails, more people could take advantage of the area's outdoor offerings especially on weekends. The events are in conjunction with World Car Free Day, each Sept. 22. Learn more about the events around Car Free Day here. Also, you can offset your carbon footprint with Carbonfund.org in support of outstanding projects that are reducing carbon emissions in the US and abroad. Get started- calculate your carbon footprint!
[caption id="" align="alignright" width="406" caption="Wind turbines in Europe viewed close up"][/caption] The Cape Wind renewable energy project has been approved by Department of the Interior Secretary Ken Salazar, clearing the latest hurdle for the project. Since 2001, Cape Wind - an offshore wind farm proposal located just off the Massachusetts coast - has struggled through multiple battles in the courtroom and in the media from local residents including some heavy hitters like members of the Kennedys. The privately financed project will feature 130 wind turbines spread over 25 square miles off the coast of Massachusetts that will generate up to 468 megawatts and average 182 megawatts of power over the course of the year. At its peak production, the turbines will power 700,000 houses - or about 75% of the electricity demanded at Cape Cod, Martha's Vineyard and Nantucket Island. The project is expected to create several hundred construction jobs and cut carbon dioxide emissions from conventional power plants by up to 700,000 tons annually. That is equivalent to removing 175,000 cars from the road for a year. The controversy with the project has centered around the potential environmental and aesthetic impacts that the turbines will have on the historic Cape Cod area. Located 5 miles off the coast on a shoal, some residents including members of the Kennedys are concerned about views. Extensive underwater environmental impact assessments have been undertaken, with more to come; they have thus far determined that the turbine bases will have minimal impacts on the local environments. There's still no assurance yet that the turbines will be built as more lawsuits are expected; however, the Interior Department's approval is important news for US wind and clean energy development.
Monday, 08 February 2010 16:14

Canada Commits to 17% CO2 Reductions

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The Canadian Government has officially informed the United Nations (UN) that the country is committed to reducing emissions 17% by 2020. The UN requested that all participating countries at the climate meetings in Copenhagen commit to a 17% carbon emissions reduction target from a 2005 baseline. Canada's carbon footprint in 2006 was measured at 544,680,000 metric tons of CO2. Meaning that a 17% reduction would result in about 92,595,600 fewer tons of CO2 emissions every year for the nation of about 34 million. This is not the first time that Canada has made a strong commitment to emissions reductions to the UN. Canada signed on to the Kyoto Protocol in 1997, committing the nation to CO2 reductions from a 1990 baseline. In spite of this commitment, Canadian emissions continued to rise to an extent. The US has pledged to cut its greenhouse gas emissions by 17 percent by 2020 from 2005 levels, though the commitment is contingent on passing legislation by Congress.
Monday, 13 September 2010 11:56

Cutting Campus Food Waste & Global Warming Emissions

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About one-quarter of all the food prepared in the U.S. gets thrown out, according to the EPA. That's 31 million tons of food each year, much of which decomposes in landfills to produce methane—a heat-trapping gas about 23 times more potent than CO2. The foodservice company Sodexo is creating awareness about food waste among college students, linking waste to climate change. Sodexo's campaign, "Stop Wasting Food,"  is a follow-up to an Earth Day campaign in 2008 which resulted in 340 campuses eliminating the use of food trays. The current campaign urges students to take only what they can eat at campus dining facilities. Tom Post, Sodexo's president of campus services, said, "We are so careful to source and serve food for our customers in a sustainable way but if locally-sourced food ends up in a landfill then we're simply creating another environmental problem. The good news is that by simply thinking before we eat, we can trash our wasteful habits and dramatically reduce food waste today." In addition to methane from food waste, it entails disposal and therefore carbon emissions from transporting the waste. Food waste is also wasted resources. To reduce waste, Sodexo said it had helped National Geographic reduce water consumption by 18 percent in its cafeteria between 2006 and 2009. The company also assisted Cox Communications with improved recycling and composting, cutting waste by 80 percent. Learn more about how you can reduce your climate impact by visiting Carbonfund.org's Save Energy page: www.carbonfund.org/saveenergy.