Thursday, 10 April 2014 10:09

Companies Beginning to Embrace Transparency on Climate Change Policies

Written by  Jessie
IKEA Headquarters in Älmhult, Sweden IKEA Headquarters in Älmhult, Sweden Sbotig/CC BY-SA 3.0

Last month there was a question as to whether or not Ford lobbied Congress on the Keystone XL Pipeline.  However, publically the automakers’ sustainability marketing promises to help achieve "climate stabilization".  In the US, companies have to disclose the subject of their lobbying, but do not have to disclose the position for which they are lobbying.  This incomplete reporting raises consumer and investor concerns.  Smart businesses are beginning to embrace transparency on climate change policies.

Take Ikea Group, for example.  The company recently released this infographic to transparently share their position on climate change.  In it, IKEA explained why climate change is relevant to its business interests.  And they not only made it clear where they stand on the issue and which policy actions they support, they also communicated the message directly to European policymakers.   IKEA is lobbying for ambitious, legally-binding 2030 targets for carbon dioxide emissions, renewable power and energy efficiency.

Not all companies take a black or white stance on global warming.  Some are merely silent on the issue.  There are a multitude of reasons including fear of publically taking a position on a political topic that might push away customers.  Some businesses are grappling internally with climate change’s risks and opportunities, putting out consistent messaging, and trying to find the capacity to publically engage on the issue.  Whatever the reason, it is certainly delaying much needed political breakthroughs on climate change.

Although businesses fall different places on the continuum of how to publically address climate change, there are resources available to help them engage responsibly with the issue.  Take this guide that is a baseline for action and transparent reporting from the World Resources Institute, which was informed by the United Nations and business leaders, policymakers, and investors.

With the release of the latest Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change (IPCC) report, companies can expect more scrutiny from customers, shareholders and stakeholders regarding their position on global warming.  Businesses can make a positive impact on the issue and the time to start acting is now.

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