Monday, 12 November 2012 13:19

Climate Change Takes High Toll on Antarctica Peninsula

Written by  Jessie
Underwater Antarctica's McMurdo Sound Underwater Antarctica's McMurdo Sound NSF/USAP photo by Steve Clabuesch

The hole in the ozone layer over Antarctica is allowing more heat to escape there, and the effects from climate change are dramatic.  Over 60 years, mid-winter temperatures along the Antarctic Peninsula have risen 10 degrees Fahrenheit.  The temperature rise has impacted annual sea ice’s seasonal duration and offshore bulk by approximately 40 percent. 

As you read this you may be asking yourself, “Okay so Antarctica is melting, but how does that impact me?”  Well, more than 50 percent of the U.S. population lives in coastal areas.  Since 1980, eight large ice shelves have broken off the Antarctic Peninsula.  As the ice shelves separate from the mainland, they make it easier for glaciers to flow into the sea and melt.  As they melt, the seas rise and we have more flooding along coastal areas.  All coastal areas, not just on the U.S. coastline, are susceptible to the dangers of flooding.  The Wilkins Ice Shelf, which is a floating ice sheet several hundred feet thick the size of the state of Connecticut, is currently hanging on to the Antarctic Peninsula by a thread. 

And there’s more.  Rapid warming is killing off a priceless resource that we’re just beginning to discover.  Sponges, soft corals, starfish, and sea squirts can only live at constant low polar temperatures.  These Antarctic seafloor invertebrates could offer cures to human diseases such as cancer, AIDS, cystic fibrosis, and infectious diseases.   Scientists at the National Cancer Institute have already found one such example.  These researchers discovered that a small Antarctic sea squirt contains chemicals that kill melanoma, the deadliest form of skin cancer.

The Antarctic Peninsula is probably not your backyard, but the losses it’s sustaining from climate change could affect you personally.  Take action now.  Perhaps start by lowering your carbon footprint.  Global warming is having serious, life-threatening impacts and we have to do our parts now to turn the tide.

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