Friday, 16 October 2009 19:02

A Look at Our Projects: Tensas River National Wildlife Refuge Reforestation Project

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100 years ago, the Lower Mississippi Alluvial Valley in Northeastern Louisiana was a wetland ecosystem that supported 22 million acres of forested habitat. After decades of land conversion for agriculture this region now supports less than 20% of that forested habitat. With help from the US Fish and Wildlife Service and the Trust for Public Land, Carbonfund.org is working to restore some of this area to its original splendor. tensas2The Tensas River National Wildlife Refuge Reforestation Project will restore approximately 1,870 acres of native bottomland hardwood forest that will re-establish habitat for an estimated 400 species of mammals, birds, reptiles, amphibians and fish including threatened and endangered species such as the Louisiana Black Bear and the Florida Panther. The newly forested area will also benefit the local community by providing suitable areas for hiking and biking, a destination for school groups and an opportunity for nature photography. Reforestation and forest preservation carbon offset projects are part of the global warming solution. Forest-based carbon offset projects fight climate change by sequestering carbon dioxide emissions from the atmosphere in trees and soil and have many co-benefits for the community and local wildlife. Forest preservation creates jobs, maintains and expands wildlife habitats, protects biodiversity, and improves local environmental quality. This project was the first reforestation project in North America to be validated to both the Voluntary Carbon Standard and the Climate, Community and Biodiversity Standards. To learn more about this and other Carbonfund.org carbon offset projects visit www.carbonfund.org/projects.

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