Thursday, 15 December 2011 11:29

Five Ideas for Alternative Gift Wrap

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Carbonfund.org posted this blog last year, and it is worth re-posting as we all go into a weekend of gift wrapping for the holiday season. Each year Americans produce four million tons of garbage from gift wrap and shopping bags alone, according to the waste watchers at Use Less Stuff. Reduce your landfill impact this holiday season by checking out these alternative ways to wrap gifts. 1. Seeded paper: Give two gifts in one by wrapping presents with seeded paper. Bloomin' Flower Cards makes a gift wrap from 100% recycled paper infused with wildflower seeds like Black-Eyed Susans and Forget-Me-Nots. Just take the wrapping outside, dig a shallow hole, drop the paper, cover with soil and water periodically. Flowers will burst from the site in 4-8 weeks. 2. Post-consumer wrapping paper: If sleek and smooth wrapping paper is more your style, there's no reason not to use a recycled brand. EndoPrint makes prints on 100% post-consumer waste paper certified by the Forest Stewardship Council. All ink is soy-based and non-toxic and, to top it off, completely chlorine-free. The company also supports wind power production. They have some really neat designs like candy cane snowflakes or deco orange pods. 3. Reused materials: Because you go straight to your GPS navigator for directions anyway, use old paper maps to make your gift stand out in intricately designed paper. If there aren't any maps lying around, used bookstores usually have diverse collection of metro, street and world maps. 4. Recycled bows: Some people save and horde gift bows for reuse, but if the bow coffers are low this year you don't have to run to the store to refill. Crafty how-to blog How About Orange takes you through four easy steps to make your own out of glossy magazine pages. 5. Fabric wrapping: Rather than trying to save and smooth out crumpled paper for next year, invest in a set of reusable fabric bags. There are a number of vendors who sell pre-made bags or fabrics cut to match different sized boxes, or you can watch this great video to learn how to use your own fabrics to wrap gifts in the Japanese Furoshiki style.
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