Tuesday, 22 February 2011 10:44

Anvil Knitwear: Fashion Forward and Eco Conscious

Written by 
Anvil Knitwear, a century-old apparel brand, has joined the fast-growing Business for Innovative Climate & Energy Policy (BICEP) coalition. Anvil becomes the 20th member of BICEP, a group of major American companies committed to working with businesses and policymakers to enact meaningful energy and climate policies. For Anvil, joining BICEP is an important next step toward ensuring sustainable global growth. BICEP’s core principles call for reducing greenhouse gases, promoting energy efficiency, and supporting creation of a globally competitive clean energy economy. Anvil’s practices have long been aligned with these principles; the company has taken steps to measure, reduce and report on its own environmental footprint. Anvil's eco collection is comprised of 15 environmentally friendly t-shirts, fleeces and bags, including the AnvilOrganic® line made with 100 percent organic cotton. The AnvilRecycled™ tee, made from 69 percent pre-consumer recycled cotton, is certified CarbonFree® by Carbonfund.org and was the first carbon-neutral recycled cotton t-shirt on the market. BICEP is coordinated by Ceres, a national network of investors, environmental organizations and other public interest groups working with companies and investors to address sustainability challenges such as global climate change. While Anvil is the newest BICEP member, it joined Ceres and adopted its principles in 2007. Within months of its founding with just five charter members, BICEP became a leading business voice for comprehensive energy and climate policy in the last Congress where such legislation came closer than ever to becoming a reality. The U.S. House passed comprehensive legislation in June 2009, and a Senate coalition headed by Democrat John Kerry of Massachusetts and Independent Joseph Lieberman of Connecticut sponsored similar legislation for the Senate. The Obama administration has also been active in pushing for comprehensive energy and climate action.
Read 1484 times